The China Wedding Photo Guide

The China Wedding Photo Guide

As with all event photography there is one piece of advice out there that is essential: be prepared. This is ever-more true for photographing weddings. Just turning up on the day and firing off 100 shots may work out if you’re very experienced, normally however, it just ends up being a stressful day that you’ll wish you could re-try. The trick is to find out as much as possible beforehand. How many people will attend, is there a special program for the day, and above all: visit the venue (or venues) prior to the event so that you can gain an understanding of the available light and size of the place.

Blog

Any second thoughts?

The same “rings” true for weddings in China but it’s important to note that the day’s program may vary a little from ceremonies held in the west. It’s fairly common for the photographer to start at 8am and attend the bride or groom’s home to capture preparations. Following this, there is then the tradition of the groom actually paying somebody money for his new found bride. Obviously this is not real but more of a re-enactment of a historical past-time.

Blog

The ring exchange.

Once the ceremony is over (this can also involve confetti and bouquet throwing) it’s down to business and in China that means food.

Blog

Confettit

But wait a moment. If you’re the photographer you now must follow the happy couple around the restaurant as they toast all the guests at their tables. This can go on for a long time because once the biajiu (chinese liqueur) starts flowing, the ganbei’s (cheers) takes on a new meaning. Good opportunity to get some warm pictures though.

Blog

Ganbei! Cheers.